14: Once the Moon Leaves

In this episode, Curtis and Joe take listeners on a whirlwind tour of college programming, astrophysics, and Wikipedia searches.

Links for this episode:

Solaris (operating system) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bowling Green State University

What is the difference between CCD and CMOS image sensors in a digital camera?

Extinction (astronomy) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (“interstellar reddening” – Ed.)

Cepheid variable – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Redshift – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rayleigh scattering – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Snell’s window – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Uncertainty principle – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

xkcd: Large Hadron Collider

Elon Musk’s mission to Mars | Technology | The Guardian

Mars One

Kerbal Space Program

List of orbits – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Wow. – Ed.)

Space Shuttle | NASA

Dragon | SpaceX

The Soyuz spacecraft

United Launch Alliance

Jason Snell (@jsnell) | Twitter

The Drake Equation | SETI Institute

A Brief History Of Neil deGrasse Tyson Ruining Things For Us On Twitter

Red matter – Memory Alpha – Wikia

Home Page of Kip S. Thorne

Relativistic Baseball

Alcubierre drive – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (“warp drive” – Ed.)

Lawrence Krauss

In Star Trek, does the original die in teleportation?

Dyson sphere – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Starkiller Base – Wookieepedia – Wikia

Binary star – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (“Roche lobe overflow”, apparently. – Ed.)

13: The Objectively-Correct Position

In today’s circus of mundanity, Curtis and Joe discuss Levelatorizing and audio quality, the appeal of handfeel, iPad Pros and cons, Microsoft!, and standing while playing video games.

Links for this episode:

The Levelator® from the Conversations Network

Mossberg: understanding the iPhone SE and iPad Pro

Intel Stops The Tick-Tock Clock

The Perfect iPad 2 Pants Pocket

Yahoo to Keep Alibaba Stake but Spin Off Core Businesses

Microsoft is bringing the Bash shell to Windows 10

Embrace, extend and extinguish – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sony is reportedly developing a ‘PlayStation 4.5’ for 4K gaming

List of stereoscopic video games – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

12: Not Even Once

In this episode, Curtis and Joe get looped in yet again and discuss the new iPhone SE and iPad Pro, bringin’ your ARAM, phone cases (or the lack thereof), and Apple’s questionable software processes.

Links for this episode:

Apple Event – Keynote March 2016

APPLE EVENT OFFICIALLY SCHEDULED FOR MONDAY, MARCH 21

Live from Apple’s iPhone SE and iPad Pro event – The Verge

Andrew S. Grove 1936 – 2016

Dynamic random-access memory – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Intel Celeron processor families

5by5 | Hypercritical #86: Naked Robotic Core

Quote by Henry Ford

Think Different | Bunsen Blog

Rosetta (software) – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Classic Environment – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Folklore.org: Pirate Flag

11: Screwdriver of Ultimate Power

In this episode, Curtis voids his warranty, Captain Picard keeps talking and talking, and the finer points of iDevice designs are debated.

Links for this episode:

iPhone 5 Battery Replacement – iFixit

iPhone 5 Battery Replacement Program – Apple Support

Anodizing – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

iTunes Match Match Explicit Songs Matches Clean | Apple Support Communities

The Picard Song – DarkMateria

10: There’s the Foghorn

In this episode, Curtis and Joe talk about caffeination, the key to blogging, the encryption debate, voracious VR requirements, and V-NAND (yell it in your head).

Links for this episode:

The Long Tail – Wired Blogs

Kirkland Signature™ Pacific Bold Coffee 200 K-Cup® Pods

IN RE ORDER REQUIRING APPLE, INC. TO ASSIST IN THE EXECUTION OF A SEARCH WARRANT ISSUED BY THIS COURT.

Apple’s Cloud Loophole: Mossberg | Re/code

HTC Vive

Oculus Founder: Rift will come to Mac if Apple “ever releases a good computer” – Ars Technica

SteamVR Performance Test

Samsung unveils 2.5-inch 16TB SSD: The world’s largest hard drive – Ars Technica